Tanglefoot (The Clockwork Century #1.2) by Cherie Priest

Stonewall Jackson survived Chancellorsville. England broke the Union’s naval blockade, and formally recognized the Confederate States of America. Atlanta never burned.

It is 1880. The American Civil War has raged for nearly two decades, driving technology in strange and terrible directions. Combat dirigibles skulk across the sky and armoured vehicles crawl along the land. Military scientists twist the laws of man and nature and barter their souls for weapons powered by light, fire, and steam.

But life struggles forward for soldiers and ordinary citizens. The fractured nation is dotted with stricken towns and epic scenes of devastation–some manmade, and some more mysterious. In the western territories, cities are swallowed by gas and walled away to rot while the frontiers are strip-mined for resources. On the borders between North and South, spies scour and scheme, and smugglers build economies more stable than their governments.

This is the Clockwork Century.

It is dark here, and different.

My Review of Tanglefoot

Free to read online, Tanglefoot is a short steampunk story set in The Clockwork Century universe. It’s standalone so you don’t need to have read the first book in the series before you read this.

Edwin is a young boy living in hiding in a sanitarium, in the basement lab of an elderly inventor. As the inventor slowly slides into dementia, Edwin becomes more and more lonely, eventually building himself a robot friend that he names Ted.

But robot Ted isn’t as friendly as Edwin hoped it would be.

I love Cherie Priest’s books, and this atmospheric and creepy short story is a good starting point for the Clockwork Century series.

You can read Tanglefoot online for free.

Tanglefoot
The Clockwork Century
Cherie Priest
Steampunk
34

Folding Beijing by Hao Jingfang, Ken Liu (translator)

Folding Beijing Cover

A good story that starts off well and has some very interesting ideas.

The city of Beijing has solved it’s over population problem by splitting the city into three different spaces that can move and fold up underground. Each space unfolds into the open at a different time, and of course, the rich people in First Space get longer out in the open.

Third Space was vibrant and full of life, I enjoyed the parts that were set there. When the character actually reaches First Space though I thought the story became dull and flat, only picking up again at the end.

You can read online at Uncanny Magazine for free

Folding Beijing
Hao Jingfang
Sci-Fi
January 2015
40

Hello, Moto by Nnedi Okorafor

hello moto

There is witchcraft in science and a science to witchcraft. Both will conspire against you eventually.

My Review of Hello, Moto

In Hello, Moto, technology and magic merge into one very interesting short story.

Philo had been in Jos when the riots happened. I knew it was her and her wig. A technology I had created. Neurotransmitters, mobile phones, incantation, and hypnosis- even I knew my creation was genius. But all it sparked in the North was death and mayhem.

It left me with more questions than answers and it’s a massive cliffhanger ending, but I feel like that’s a good thing.

You definitely need to use your own imagination when you’re reading this.

Read for free at Tor.com

Hello, Moto
Nnedi Okorafor
Fantasy
Online Short Story

The Tides by Ken Liu

“When I was little,” Dad says, softly chuckling, “the Moon was so small I thought I could put it in my pocket, like a coin.” I don’t answer because there’s no time to talk. The tide is coming.

Short (very short – 3 or 4 pages worth) post-apocalyptic story that somehow manages to pack more story in than most books.

It has some very touching moments and some beautiful phrases.

“I guess the Moon loves the Earth too much. She wants to come closer for a kiss.”

A must read!

You can read The Tides online for free

The Tides
Ken Liu
Sci-Fi
Online Short Story