A Blackbird in Silver by Freda Warrington (Blackbird #1)

A Blackbird in Silver Cover

Blackbird in Silver Blurb

From Forluin, green, half-fabled land of beauty and peace, has journeyed the gentle Estarinel, bearing tragic news.

From the terrible Empire of Gorethria rides Ashurek; a lean and deadly warrior, once High Commander of its Armies, scourge of the Earth, hated and feared across continents.

The third is known only as Medrian. Coldly wrapped in her cloak of sorrow, her eyes deep-shadowed with suffering long-endured, she will explain nothing of her reasons.

Theirs is the Quest. They must slay the great Serpent before it lays waste and utterly destroys the Earth. Together they must seek its lair in the far frozen north, battling peril and nightmare until they face the ultimate, indestructible foe.

Three warriors. An epic Quest. They are the world’s last hope.

My Reviews of other Books in the Series

A Blackbird in Darkness (Blackbird #2)

A Blackbird in Amber (Blackbird #3)

A Blackbird in Twilight (Blackbird #4)

My Review of A Blackbird in Silver

A Blackbird in Silver (Blackbird, #1)A Blackbird in Silver by Freda Warrington
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Three mismatched companions start out on a quest to find a way to kill the great serpent M’gulfn that is trying to destroy the Earth. The serpent is slowly spreading despair and anguish, causing wars and laying countries to waste so nothing can grow or survive there.

I first read this book about 20 years ago, and it’s survived 4 house moves, my years at university and many, many book clear outs.

It’s rare that I remember much that happens in books I’ve read before, and I don’t remember how it ends or how it started, but what I do remember is the feeling I got reading this series.

That’s stopped me getting rid of the books many times over the years. I always meant to re-read it, but in a few months I’m going to a convention where Freda Warrington will be appearing so I thought I should read it again before I take it to get it signed.

The way it’s written reminds me of how Ursula Le Guin or Tanith Lee writes. It’s quite simplistic in style, almost in the way a children’s book would be, though the content is very adult and the characters find themselves in some dark situations.

The three companions that set out on the quest have rich and detailed backstories and don’t instantly bond.

Ashurek’s story is very detailed and he is a very complex character. he’s been through a lot and done some very bad things but even though he realises this, he also knows it’s M’gulfn’s influence that sent him on this path. He wants to make amends but he’s not consumed by guilt.

Medrian I remembered from the first time I read the book, the cold, pale, dark haired woman that won’t explain her reason for joining the quest, I also remembered what her secret is. That’s probably affected my re-read, I’m not getting the sense of mystery or confusion over her behaviour that I probably should be. But she is still my favourite character in the story, quiet and withdrawn and acts almost like she is in constant pain, but she still comes alive when in danger or in a fight. We see rare smiles, glimpses of what she would be like if she weren’t carrying these dark secrets.

Though the basic story elements are standard fantasy fare it’s taken in a different direction. It has strong, unique characters that carry the story and I found myself engrossed in their stories.

Things get very dark, with some almost horror elements finding their way in, demons, torture and dead soldiers raised to fight for the enemy. There’s a hopeless, desperate feel that permeates the book.

There’s also a bit of sci-fi mixed in, but I won’t go into that because I don’t want to spoil the plot!

These things make it stand out from the norm, it’s something a bit different if you read a lot of fantasy books.

It’s a hard one for me to rate, I would normally say 3 stars, but I still think about this book 20 years after reading it and that has to lift it to a 4.

A Blackbird in Silver
Blackbird
Freda Warrington
Fantasy
March 5th 1992
304

The Rose Society (The Young Elites #2) by Marie Lu

The Rose Society

The Rose Society Blurb

Once upon a time, a girl had a father, a prince, a society of friends. Then they betrayed her, and she destroyed them all.

Adelina Amouteru’s heart has suffered at the hands of both family and friends, turning her down the bitter path of revenge. Now known and feared as the White Wolf, she flees Kenettra with her sister to find other Young Elites in the hopes of building her own army of allies. Her goal: to strike down the Inquisition Axis, the white-cloaked soldiers who nearly killed her.

But Adelina is no heroine. Her powers, fed only by fear and hate, have started to grow beyond her control. She does not trust her newfound Elite friends. Teren Santoro, leader of the Inquisition, wants her dead. And her former friends, Raffaele and the Dagger Society, want to stop her thirst for vengeance. Adelina struggles to cling to the good within her. But how can someone be good when her very existence depends on darkness?

My Review of The Rose Society

The Rose Society (The Young Elites, #2)The Rose Society by Marie Lu
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The second in the series but unlike a lot of trilogies this middle book isn’t just a time filler.

There’s a lot I like about this series and I find it very readable. It’s interesting to read a story written from a villain’s point of view. Adelina is not a nice person and not overly concerned with the welfare of her friends and family. She is very selfish in all her relationships, she expects ‘friends’ and family to be there for her with nothing given in return. She does want to help the other Malfettos who are being mistreated, used as slaves, and half starved to death, but I think that’s really just incidental to her goal of revenge.

None of the characters in The Rose Society are written as black or white, good or bad people. There are no villains who are bad just for the sake of it, everyone has reasons for their actions.

Even the members of Dagger society aren’t the ‘good’ guys. They’re also trying to steal the throne and make Enzo the ruler of Kenettra but unlike Adelina they aren’t concerned with helping the other Malfettos.

The plot though, and the politics of the countries and the relationships between the characters are all very simplistic and basic. It all sort of takes a back seat to what bad thing is Adelina going to do next.

Not a bad thing really if you don’t want to read about all the politics and intrigues behind ruling a country, and it lets the books move a lot faster. But I think it would definitely benefit from slowing down, developing relationships a bit more and making things a bit more difficult, to make it more believable.

For example, as soon as Adelina gets off the ship in Kennetra she immediately sees a member of the Dagger Society, follows her to a meeting, and overhears the Dagger Society plotting to overthrow the Queen. She very conveniently finds out all their plans and secrets in about 5 minutes.

And I don’t understand why she has these feelings for Magiano. Because he kissed her once? Why does he like her so much? They never even have a real conversation. Though I wish they would because I like how they are together.

The writing and the dialogue are often clunky too, bordering on slightly cheesy sometimes. Adelina’s internal dialogue is fine, but when people start giving speeches it all gets a bit cringey.

Despite the flaws I am enjoying this series a lot, it’s fun and fast moving and a bit different to the normal ya fantasy series. And Marie Liu really knows how to end a book! I have to read the next one now.

The Rose Society
The Young Elites
Marie Lu
Young Adult Fantasy
October 13th 2015
432

Minion (Vampire Huntress #1) by L.A. Banks

minion

Minion Blurb

All Damali Richards ever wanted to do was create music and bring it to the people. Now she is a spoken word artist and the top act for Warriors of Light Records. But come nightfall, she hunts vampires and demons—predators that people tend to dismiss as myth or fantasy.

When strange attacks erupt within the club drug-trafficking network and draw the attention of the police, Damali realizes these killings are a bit out of the ordinary, even for vampires. Soon she discovers that behind these brutal murders is the most powerful vampire Damali has ever met—a seductive beast who is coming for her next…

My Review of Minion

Minion (Vampire Huntress, #1)Minion by L.A. Banks
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

dnf at page 148.

I had high hopes for Minion, I really wanted to like it. But the story ripped straight from Buffy, the confusing writing, too many viewpoints, and a cast of bland characters meant I got bored and gave up halfway through.

Nothing about the world or the background of the characters was explained, we are dropped straight into the middle of the action with no reference points or understanding of what’s going on.

Halfway through the book and there was still have explanation of what they’re fighting or why they’re doing.

The confusing writing doesn’t help, some sentences just didn’t make sense no matter how many times I read them.

Maybe it gets better later on, or in the next book, because this is a popular series. But for me it’s not worth the effort to even finish this one.

Minion
L.A. Banks
Urban Fantasy

The Young Elites (The Young Elites #1) by Marie Lu

The Young Elites Book Review

The Young Elites Blurb

I am tired of being used, hurt, and cast aside.

Adelina Amouteru is a survivor of the blood fever. A decade ago, the deadly illness swept through her nation. Most of the infected perished, while many of the children who survived were left with strange markings. Adelina’s black hair turned silver, her lashes went pale, and now she has only a jagged scar where her left eye once was. Her cruel father believes she is a malfetto, an abomination, ruining their family’s good name and standing in the way of their fortune. But some of the fever’s survivors are rumored to possess more than just scars—they are believed to have mysterious and powerful gifts, and though their identities remain secret, they have come to be called the Young Elites.

Teren Santoro works for the king. As Leader of the Inquisition Axis, it is his job to seek out the Young Elites, to destroy them before they destroy the nation. He believes the Young Elites to be dangerous and vengeful, but it’s Teren who may possess the darkest secret of all.

Enzo Valenciano is a member of the Dagger Society. This secret sect of Young Elites seeks out others like them before the Inquisition Axis can. But when the Daggers find Adelina, they discover someone with powers like they’ve never seen.

Adelina wants to believe Enzo is on her side, and that Teren is the true enemy. But the lives of these three will collide in unexpected ways, as each fights a very different and personal battle. But of one thing they are all certain: Adelina has abilities that shouldn’t belong in this world. A vengeful blackness in her heart. And a desire to destroy all who dare to cross her.

It is my turn to use. My turn to hurt.

My Review of The Young Elites

The Young Elites (The Young Elites, #1)The Young Elites by Marie Lu
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I did like the style of writing here, but sometimes it became clunky and awkward and a lot of the dialogue is verging on cheesy. Teren Santoro keeps making speeches to the public that remind me of Prince Humperdink

Prince Humperdink

The stuff about the alignments to different aspects, fear, passion etc wasn’t very well handled. For example, when she is attracted to someone she feels her alignment to passion stir. Erm, wouldn’t everyone? Again it came across a bit cheesy and like Marie Lu felt she had to throw it in every so often because otherwise it wasn’t really explained.

The world building was minimal. There were impressions of a rich world with many different cultures, and even more exciting – flying animal / dragon creatures. We never see or experience any of it though! Possibly because Adelina has led a sheltered life and is made very self-obsessed by her problems, but even when she is venturing around a new city and visits the market place we get a very sketchy view of it. No sights or smells are brought to life for us.

I liked that it’s a different kind of story though. Adelina isn’t a perfect heroine type, she’s kinda selfish and vengeful and wants to be the one in charge with everyone doing what she tells them to. In fact, there are no good people / bad people in this book, everyone is a bit of both. I think this kept the story interesting when it could easily have been bland.

The powers of the Elites were varied and interesting. I’d have liked to have seen more of the other characters. They were glossed over in the story with only glimpses here and there of what their personalities were and what they are capable of. Their friendship with Adelina were minimal at best, even though it becomes important to the story.

I will be reading the next one, I think things could get very interesting now and I want to see what happens next. Does Adelina become a villain or an anti-hero? How far can she push her powers? Will we see more Malfettos with powers? And that epilogue!

View all my reviews on GoodReads

The Young Elites
The Young Elites
Marie Lu
Young Adult Fantasy
October 7th 2014
355

The Bear and the Nightingale (The Winternight Trilogy #1) by Katherine Arden

The Bear and the Nightingale

Book Description

At the edge of the Russian wilderness, winter lasts most of the year and the snowdrifts grow taller than houses. But Vasilisa doesn’t mind—she spends the winter nights huddled around the embers of a fire with her beloved siblings, listening to her nurse’s fairy tales.

After Vasilisa’s mother dies, her father goes to Moscow and brings home a new wife. Fiercely devout, city-bred, Vasilisa’s new stepmother forbids her family from honoring the household spirits. The family acquiesces, but Vasilisa is frightened, sensing that more hinges upon their rituals than anyone knows.

And indeed, crops begin to fail, evil creatures of the forest creep nearer, and misfortune stalks the village. All the while, Vasilisa’s stepmother grows ever harsher in her determination to groom her rebellious stepdaughter for either marriage or confinement in a convent.

As danger circles, Vasilisa must defy even the people she loves and call on dangerous gifts she has long concealed—this, in order to protect her family from a threat that seems to have stepped from her nurse’s most frightening tales.

My Review of The Bear and the Nightingale

The Bear and the NightingaleThe Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The Bear and the Nightingale is set in Russia and is based on Russian myths and fairytales. I love fairytale’s and modern retellings of them, and this one is dark and chilling, and just beautifully written.

I liked how it starts quite slowly when Vasilisa is born. Vasilisa’s family live in a big house deep in the Russian countryside, their winters are cold and long and getting caught outside at night means death. The author spends a lot of time creating a world of long dark winters, honey cakes, woods and wildness and the magical characters that live in them. It’s easy to lose yourself in the atmosphere that’s created, I could feel the cold along with the characters!

Vasilia is wonderful, wild and raised to be independent, she has magic and power of her own that becomes more apparent as she gets older. The story gets more magical and a lot darker as Vasilia has to fight to save her family and her village from the Bear.

Very readable, and I absolutely recommend it. I didn’t want to put it down, and I stayed up far too late to finish the last few chapters.

I received a free copy from the publisher in return for an honest review.

The Bear and the Nightingale
The Winternight Trilogy
Katherine Arden
Fantasy
January 10th 2017
336

Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal

stories for Punjabi widows

Description

Nikki is a modern young Punjabi woman, who has spent most of her twenty-odd years distancing herself from her community and living an independent (read: western) life. But after the death of her father leaves her family in financial straits, she takes a job as a creative writing teacher for a group of aging widows at her temple and discovers that the white dupatta of the widow hides more than just a few greying hairs.

These are women who have lived in the shadows of fathers, brothers and husbands their whole lives, being dutiful, raising children and going to temple. They may not have a great grasp of English but what they do have is a wealth of stories and fantasies that they are no longer afraid to share with the other women in the group.

As Nikki realises that she must keep the illicit nature of the class secret from the Brothers—a group of highly conservative young men who have started policing the morals of the temple and the wider community—she starts to help these women voice their desires, and also begins to uncover the truth about the sudden recent death of a young Sikh woman.

My Review

Erotic Stories for Punjabi WidowsErotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Nikki doesn’t know what she wants to do with her life. She quit her law degree and is now working in a pub. Looking for a way to earn a bit of money she takes a job to teach a storytelling class for widows at a temple in Southall.

At first, Nikki is dismissive of her students, expecting them to be dull and timid. She thinks that she can get them to tell stories that she can then create a book from – it felt almost as though she set out to exploit them.

She soon finds out that most of the women in the class don’t know how to read and write, and her job is actually to teach them. Not only that, her students were pushed into signing up and resent being taught as though they were children. They quickly hijack Nikki’s class, and turn it into the storytelling class it was meant to be, but with a twist. They want to tell erotic stories!

I found it hard to get into at first. A lot of characters are introduced, conversations wander, everything feels vague and the students are hard to tell apart from each other. Nikki feels bland and her personality doesn’t come across very strongly. Her class is quickly taken away from her and she is pushed around by her students and her work mates.

It settled down after the first 40% or so, and I found myself engrossed in the story. The students’ personalities start to emerge and I could see that they were a group of lively, smart women all with their own views on life. Their conversations were so funny! I loved reading their life stories.

The erotic stories are wonderful little gems dotted throughout the book. The widows say they can get away with telling them because they are forgotten and ignored by their community. No one pays them attention, they are expected to fade into the background.

Still, they have to keep what they are doing secret. A group of young men known as The Brother’s patrol the community watching the women to make sure they are behaving properly.

That brings in a darker theme to the book. Nikki’s boss at the temple Kulwinder starts to become suspicious of what they are doing in the class and they are in danger of being found out. And something has happened to Kulwinder’s daughter Maya that everyone keeps hinting at but no one will explain to Nikki.

At the end the pacing felt off again, everything happens in a rush. It’s all resolved very neatly, everything is tied up and ends happily. It’s positive and uplifting, but I don’t feel like it would actually happen. There’s a dark side to the book but the reality behind this feels pushed to one side in favour of a happy ending.

But at the same time, I do like that it ends positively. This is a warm and kindhearted book, I feel like Balli Kaur Jaswal really loves her characters and this shines through in her writing. The happy ending feels right for the book, and it certainly left me feeling happier!

I received a free copy from the publisher in return for an honest review.

View all my reviews

Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows
Balli Kaur Jaswal
Fiction

Street Magic (Black London #1) by Caitlin Kittredge

Street Magic black London #1 review

Street Magic Description

Pete Caldecott was just sixteen when she met Jack Winter, a gorgeous, larger-than-life  mage who thrilled her with his witchcraft. Then a spirit Jack summoned killed him before Pete’s eyes.

Now a detective , Pete is investigating the case of a young girl kidnapped from the streets of London. A tip has led police directly to the child but when Pete meets the informant, she’s shocked to learn he is none other than Jack.

Strung out on heroin, Jack is a shadow of his former self.  But he’s able to tell Pete exactly where Bridget’s kidnappers are hiding: in the supernatural shadow-world of the fey.

Even though she’s spent years disavowing the supernatural, Pete follows Jack into the invisible fey underworld, where she hopes to discover the truth about what happened to Bridget—and what happened to Jack on that dark day so long ago.

My Review of Street Magic

Street Magic (Black London, #1)Street Magic by Caitlin Kittredge
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

The writing was a bit clunky and awkward. I found it was often difficult to follow what was going on, and why they are doing things.

There wasn’t much of an atmosphere to it, I didn’t get a feel for London itself, and Black London was brushed over. Pete and Jack dipped in and out of it but what it is and what it’s like wasn’t explained so it never came to life for me, I couldn’t picture it

The magic was hard to understand too, but it is a series so maybe it’s explained more in later books.

Main character Peter grated on me. I’m not convinced she is really an Inspector because she acts more like an impulsive child, shouting and whining and making daft threats to criminals. She never did any actual police work so it was hard to understand the professional side of her.

And some of the things she did were odd, like why didn’t she report the first tip off from Jack? Why keep it a secret?

I can’t remember that she what she looks like was described either. She was just a bit bland. Towards the end of the book she was getting a bit more badass, so again maybe she gets better later in the series!

I did like Jack, but I don’t understand why he holds such a grudge against Pete? He dragged her into something she didn’t understand then got upset when she ran scared. And he’d held on to it for 12 years then suddenly changed his mind?

I also liked attraction between Pete and Jack. It was building up towards the end of the book with some moments between them that sparked. I think it holds potential for future books.

Overall there just wasn’t enough magic and not enough of the police work I’d been hoping for. It didn’t hold my interest and I ended up speed reading the last third.

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Street Magic
Black London
Caitlin Kittredge
Urban Fantasy

All Darling Children by Katrina Monroe

All Darling Children review

Book Description

All boys grow up, except one.

On the tenth anniversary of her mother’s death, fourteen-year-old Madge Darling’s grandmother suffers a heart attack. With the overbearing Grandma Wendy in the hospital, Madge runs away to Chicago, intent on tracking down a woman she believes is actually her mother.

On her way to the Windy City, a boy named Peter Pan lures Madge to Neverland, a magical place where children can remain young forever. While Pan plays puppet master in a twisted game only he understands, Madge discovers the disturbing price of Peter Pan’s eternal youth.

My Review of All Darling Children
All Darling ChildrenAll Darling Children by Katrina Monroe
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

This takes the Disney version of Peter Pan and mixes in a big dollop of The Lord of the Flies. And if you think that sounds like a mix that shouldn’t work, you’d be right. Reading about the cheesiness of Tinkerbell and Smee one minute, and then sacrificing Lost Boys to ensure the survival of the Island’s magic the next is disconcerting.

Madge is the granddaughter of Wendy Darling. Though how that works when Wendy Darling was 12 or 13 in the early 1900s, and Madge is 14 in the present day, I have no idea. Anyway, she goes to Neverland with Peter Pan searching for her lost mother and the truth about her family. Once there she realises that Peter Pan is a dictator, ruling through fear and murdering anyone who stands against him.

Madge is a very underdeveloped character. She never shows any personality of her own, her only conversations with other people involve her sneering at them. Supposedly she is trying to find the truth about her family, but never displays any actual motivation towards doing anything about it.

Pan himself is much more interesting, but for me the best character in the book is the lovely Slightly. A sweet, charming boy, he is Madge’s only potential ally in the Lost Boys.

I wasn’t convinced by the story in this – there was a lot alluded to but never fully explained and Madge just ran around reacting to things and generally being unpleasant. Even her own hunger she is only aware of because Pan hears her stomach growling!

The story never got going and the battle at the end was a big anticlimax.

I received a free copy from the publisher in return for an honest review.

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All Darling Children
Katrina Monroe
Young Adult Fantasy
200

Slow Bullets by Alastair Reynolds

slow bullets review

Book Description

From the author of the Revelation Space series comes an interstellar adventure of war, identity, betrayal, and the preservation of civilization itself.

A vast conflict, one that has encompassed hundreds of worlds and solar systems, appears to be finally at an end. A conscripted soldier is beginning to consider her life after the war and the family she has left behind. But for Scur—and for humanity—peace is not to be.

On the brink of the ceasefire, Scur is captured by a renegade war criminal, and left for dead in the ruins of a bunker. She revives aboard a prisoner transport vessel. Something has gone terribly wrong with the ship.

Passengers—combatants from both sides of the war—are waking up from hibernation far too soon. Their memories, embedded in bullets, are the only links to a world which is no longer recognizable. And Scur will be reacquainted with her old enemy, but with much higher stakes than just her own life.

My review of Slow Bullets

Slow BulletsSlow Bullets by Alastair Reynolds
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Scur is a soldier who wakes up from deep sleep on a spaceship transporting war criminals and soldiers. She does not know how she got on board, and the last thing she remembers is being captured and tortured by the people she was fighting against. But it is obvious something on the ship has gone wrong, they are not where they are supposed to be, systems are failing, and the crew and passengers have been woken up too soon.

At 192 pages Slow Bullets is a short and sharp sci-fi story. It’s intelligent and thoughtful and it kept surprising me. The story itself is nothing new but it didn’t go where I expected it to. I picked it up intending to just read the first few pages and found myself reading the whole thing in one go!

I received a free copy from the publisher in return for an honest review.

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Slow Bullets
Alistair Reynolds
Sci-Fi
May 18th 2015
192

Dreams of Gods & Monsters (Daughter of Smoke & Bone #3) by Laini Taylor

Dreams of Gods and Monsters

Book Description

When Jael’s brutal seraph army trespasses into the human world, the unthinkable becomes essential, and Karou and Akiva must ally their enemy armies against the threat. It is a twisted version of their long-ago dream, and they begin to hope that it might forge a way forward for their people.

But there are bigger threats than Jael in the offing. In the skies of Eretz  something is happening. Massive stains are spreading like bruises from horizon to horizon; the great winged stormhunters are gathering as if summoned, ceaselessly circling, and a deep sense of wrong pervades the world.

From the streets of Rome to the caves of the Kirin and beyond, humans, chimaera and seraphim will fight, strive, love, and die in an epic theatre that transcends good and evil, right and wrong, friend and enemy. At the very barriers of space and time, what do gods and monsters dream of? And does anything else matter?

My reviews of Other Books in the Series

Daughter of Smoke & Bone (Daughter of Smoke & Bone #1) by Laini Taylor

Days of Blood & Starlight (Daughter of Smoke & Bone #2) by Laini Taylor

My Review of Dreams of Gods & Monsters

Dreams of Gods & Monsters (Daughter of Smoke & Bone, #3)Dreams of Gods & Monsters by Laini Taylor
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The last book in the series got off to a slow start. I found it a bit overly dramatic, and it took me nearly 200 pages to get back into the story. The addition of an entirely new character that became very important to the story didn’t help, I felt like it was a bit late in the story to throw a new person and a new story arc into the mix!

I did like Eliza though, she was interesting, smart and funny. When the things settled down and got going how she fit into the wider story started to make sense.

And there was a lot of story crammed into the second half of this book. The war between the Chimaera and the seraphs was the focus of the first two books but this one seemed to move away from that into a bigger story about the fate of all the worlds. There had been hints of this dropped in here and there so I knew there would be more eventually but it was all resolved in what felt like a mad rush at the end.

But I still enjoyed reading this, I liked the story and the writing has been wonderful throughout all three books.

Supposedly a young adult book it has more intelligence and emotional depth than most adult books. It has a strong anti-war message, and even though it got too dramatic sometimes (all the feelings, all at once) and too caught up in trying to hammer home that message it does well at showing that war isn’t this honour and glory thing it is often portrayed as.

In fact, I’m putting it up there as one of my favourite fantasy series. I’ve been hooked on Karou’s story since I started reading. The writing is beautiful and the world’s Laini Taylor creates are rich and vivid and I’ve loved losing myself in them.

I even liked the way it ended, which is unusual for me with this kind of book. The romance between Karou and Akiva was handled well, but I wish they had more time together in the book. I’m sure they didn’t have one proper conversation all through it!

It’s a series I’m going to keep on my shelves and I’m already looking forward to re-reading it.

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Dreams of Gods & Monsters
Daughter of Smoke & Bone
Laini Taylor
Young Adult Fantasy
March 26th 2015
613