Darker than the Storm (Blackbird #5) by Freda Warrington

Darker than the storm cover

The towers of Niankan-Siol soared skywards, all blue and gold and glass, seeming as light as air. Walkways, weightless and swaying, threaded between the pinnacles and spires, while winged creatures and air transports flitted and looped among the glittering heights.

My Reviews of Other Books in the Series

A Blackbird in Silver (Blackbird #1)

A Blackbird in Darkness (Blackbird #2)

A Blackbird in Amber (Blackbird #3)

A Blackbird in Twilight (Blackbird #4)

My Review of Darker than the Storm

Darker than the Storm (Blackbird, #5)Darker than the Storm by Freda Warrington
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Darker than the Storm is the fifth in the Blackbird series. It’s set between the second and third books but as it’s a self-contained story I think you could read this without having read the other books.

This book tells the story of Ashurek after he has settled down on Ikonus with his wife Silvren and their daughter Mellorn.

Ikonus is a peaceful planet, but Ashurek finds himself restless. Overcome with a strong feeling of depression he breaks the law of Ikonus and opens a way to Jhensit, another planet. He is found out and as punishment Gregardreos, the high master of Iknous, sends him to set to investigate the odd energy that Jhensit is emitting.

Ashurek lands on Jhensit in a city split into two. Nianken-Pel is the main city, Nianken-Siol is a city above the city, a glittering place of blue glass where the ruling class live. They are the Siol, and they have enslaved the Pel, the people of Nianken-Pel and persecuted them for their religious beliefs.

Blaming the Pel for all their problems the Siol are ignoring the real problem: Jhensit is a planet slowly being consumed by a maelstrom, a corrupt energy that warps the land and creates monstrous creatures.

Ashurek only wants to observe and take back information to Ikonus, but he finds himself unwillingly drawn into the conflict. He must face up to his past and make moral choices as he tries to save Jhensit from being destroyed.

Ashurek was a strong but silent type in the first two Blackbird books so I wasn’t sure that he would be able to carry a whole book on his own. But he works well as the main character, he has a dry sense of humour and a compelling voice. He knows his own faults and his strengths and isn’t afraid to take action when needed. He’s interesting to read about!

There was just enough world building to get a sense of Jhensit. I would have preferred a bit more maybe, about the two cities and the contrast between them. Nianken-Siol, the city in the sky, sounds like a beautiful but cold place full of glittering glass and I would have liked to know more about it and the people there.

The story is well paced, it moves fast without being confusing and stays interesting. It reminds me a bit of Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor. They’re quite different stories but it has a similar sort of idea of a floating palace in conflict with the city below, and both of them are beautifully written. Darker than the Storm is a lot older though, it was released in 1992, 25 years ago!

I recommend this to anyone that likes fantasy stories and is looking for something a bit different. It’s crammed full of ideas that all merge into an original and exciting read. I couldn’t put it down!

Darker than the Storm
Blackbird
Freda Warrington
Fantasy
1992
Paperback
304

Zodiac Starforce: By the Power of Astra (Zodiac Starforce #1-4) by Kevin Panetta, Paulina Ganucheau (Illustrator)

zodiac starforce Cover

They’re an elite group of teenage girls with magical powers who have sworn to protect our planet against dark creatures… as long as they can get out of class! Known as the Zodiac Starforce, these high-school girls aren’t just combating math tests. They’re also battling monsters – not your typical after school activity! But when an evil force from another dimension infects team leader Emma, she must work with her team of magically powered friends to save herself, and the world, from the evil Diana and her mean-girl minions!

From Kevin Panetta (Bravest Warriors) and Paulina Ganucheau (TMNT: New Animated Adventures, Bravest Warriors), this super-fun and heartfelt story of growing up and friendship, with plenty of magical-girl fighting action, delivers the most exciting new ensemble cast in comics.

Collects Zodiac Starforce #1-#4

My review of Zodiac Staforce: Power of Astra

Zodiac Starforce: By the Power of AstraZodiac Starforce: By the Power of Astra by Kevin Panetta
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The artwork in this is absolutely stunning. The drawings, the characters, the outfits – everything is perfect! And the colours! Bright and bold and an almost dreamy mix of pinks and purples, yet it’s still vibrant.

This would probably be a four-star rating just because it’s so lovely to look at! Luckily the story and the dialogue lives up to the artwork. It seems very influenced by Sailor Moon. There are extras in the back and one of them is a one-page story with the characters in uniforms that look very much like the Sailor Soldiers. But it’s much more modern, and a lot louder and faster paced than Sailor Moon.

I started reading thinking that this was the first volume, but there must have been one before this that explained the characters and where they got their powers. It keeps referring events that happened two years ago, where they fought a big bad and I think one of the characters lost her mother? So I did kinda feel like I was missing something, but it didn’t impact on understanding the story in this volume.

The characters are well developed and easy to tell apart. They all have their own personality and their own style. My favourite is Kim! I’m also really liking Lily.

My only complaint is that I wish it were longer. I hope there’s more coming soon.

Zodiac Starforce: By the Power of Astra
Zodiac Starforce
Kevin Panetta, Paulina Ganucheau (Illustrator)
Graphic Novel
Dark Horse Books
March 9th 2016
Graphic Novel
136

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Gone Girl Cover

On a warm summer morning in North Carthage, Missouri, it is Nick and Amy Dunne’s fifth wedding anniversary. Presents are being wrapped and reservations are being made when Nick’s clever and beautiful wife disappears.

Husband-of-the-Year Nick isn’t doing himself any favours with cringe-worthy daydreams about the slope and shape of his wife’s head, but passages from Amy’s diary reveal the alpha-girl perfectionist could have put anyone dangerously on edge.

Under mounting pressure from the police and the media—as well as Amy’s fiercely doting parents—the town golden boy parades an endless series of lies, deceits, and inappropriate behaviour.

Nick is oddly evasive, and he’s definitely bitter—but is he really a killer?

My Review of Gone Girl

Gone GirlGone Girl by Gillian Flynn
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I hated both of the main characters. Nick is just awful, he wants to always look like ‘the good guy’ and he cares nothing about the people he’s supposed to love, concerning himself only with how they make him feel.

We learn about Amy through her diary entries. Starting just as she meets Nick we see the relationship from her point of view, and it’s completely different to the relationship Nick describes.

Amy starts to get better towards the end, and by better I mean more interesting. I actually kind of admire her. Nick just gets more and more pathetic. I actually wanted him to go to jail, whether he killed his wife or not.

I don’t mind that the characters aren’t nice though, sometimes that makes a story more interesting and it works so well in Gone Girl. I liked the way the lies that both Nick and Amy have told are picked apart and the truth about the relationship and the events on their anniversary are slowly revealed.

As for the story, it’s ok, it’s nothing special but it’s interesting and twisty. The first half is full of tension and I devoured it, but the second half was a bit of a letdown. It ends well though if a bit far fetched.

The strength of the writing and storytelling save this book. Gillian Flynn creates such interesting and complex characters and her stories have layers and layers to them.

I recommend any of her books for your next thriller read.

Gone Girl
Gillian Flynn
Thriller
April 22nd 2014
Paperback
415

Where to Find Cheap Books

Couple from the film Up reading books

I very rarely pay full price for a book, in fact only if I’m buying a Kindle book or if I’ve been given a gift voucher will I actually pay the cover price.

If I really want a specific book I might pay up to £4 for it, but most of the books I buy I only pay 50p – £2.50.

This is a list of places I find cheap books. Proceed with caution though, this is one of the reasons our house is so full of books we have piles of them on the floors!

Market stalls

Books on a market stall

Our local market has a second-hand book seller with a really decent selection.

There’s always a few new books every time we go, it’s part of our Saturday routine now to have a quick look around after we get lunch.

Car boot sales

Books at a car boot sale

Car boot sales are where you will find the cheapest books, usually 50p but sometimes you can find them for 20p, or 3 for a pound.

There will be a lot of the same books, and endless copies of Dan Brown and Fifty Shades of Grey, but keep going back and keep searching because there will be good books there sometimes.

I managed to get nearly the full set of Trueblood books for about £4 – £5.

Charity shops

Books in a charity shop

One of the best places to find books, alongside the best sellers that everyone’s read you will find some gems.

I once found a charity shop with 5 or 6 Margaret Atwood books!

They will usually be a bit more expensive than buying at car boots or at markets, but normally they are less than £2.50.

The money goes to a good cause so you get to feel good about spending money for a change!

Second-hand bookshops

Second hand bookshop

These are few and far between but if you can find one they are good places to find popular authors or pick up something new to try.

Prices vary in these places, but if it’s over £3 then it’s expensive!

eBay

Most books are for sale on eBay a bit cheaper than full price.

If they’re popular or a bit rarer they might be closer to full price, but it’s worth a quick search if you’re after something specific.

Amazon

Can be slightly cheaper than eBay, but often about the same because they have a lot of the same sellers. It’s easier to find books and compare prices on Amazon though.

Giveaways

Book bloggers often have giveaways – follow a few to get notified when they are running these. Don’t forget to check they will ship to your country!

Goodreads giveaways have hundreds of competitions to win free books going on all the time. It seems to be a popular way to promote new book releases.

I won a book the first time I entered some giveaways on here. They’re easy to enter so enter loads, then just see what you end up with!

It’s asked, but not expected, that you leave a review for books that you get through the giveaways.

Be careful with Goodreads though, it’s very easy to find new books you never knew about but now you just have to read. I have a list of books to read about 200 long saved on there and it’s going up instead of down.

Book swaps

Organise book swaps with your friends / family or at work.

Where I work we have a set of shelves in the canteen, any books we’ve read and what to pass on we can just leave in there. Every so often it gets cleared out so any books that have been there for a long time get taken to charity shops.

It works well, though I do get a bit sad if I leave any books that I think are amazing, and they just get ignored.

This is a good way of getting newer books or specific books that you’ve been looking for, just ask around!

Bookbub

Bookbub is a service that gathers together Kindle or eBook books that are on offer.

You tell it what kind of genres you like and it will email you daily with the best offers in those categories.

There are a lot of self-published or lesser known publishers on there which means that the quality isn’t always great. I have found a couple of new to me authors I like through this service, and there is occasionally a well-known author with a book on offer.

Netgalley

Netgalley is a website where book reviewers and book bloggers can download free copies of books before they have been released. But, in return for the free book, you have to write and publicise a review.

When you request a book, the publisher can check your profile, and look at where you publish reviews before they approve you. It helps if you have built up a bit of a following and have been reviewing books for at least a couple of months first.

It’s a bit of extra work over the other options, but there are a lot of big names on here, and you get to read a free copy before anyone else!

A Man of Shadows (John Nyquist #1) by Jeff Noon

A Man of Shadows Cover

The brilliant, mind-bending return to science fiction by one of its most acclaimed visionaries

Below the neon skies of Dayzone – where the lights never go out, and night has been banished – lowly private eye John Nyquist takes on a teenage runaway case. His quest takes him from Dayzone into the permanent dark of Nocturna.

As the vicious, seemingly invisible serial killer known only as Quicksilver haunts the streets, Nyquist starts to suspect that the runaway girl holds within her the key to the city’s fate. In the end, there’s only one place left to search: the shadow-choked zone known as Dusk.

A Man of Shadows (John Nyquist, #1)A Man of Shadows by Jeff Noon
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I read once that taking away watches and clocks from people and not allowing them to know the time will slowly drive them mad. After reading this book I can believe it.

It starts out as a hard-boiled detective story set in a world that feels like a futuristic version of the 1950’s. The city is split into three different zones, Nocturna that is eternal night, Dusk, a place of fog and monsters where it is always twilight and no-one dare go, and Dayzone, a world of bright neon lights where it never goes dark and the citizens are constantly switching between the hundreds of different timelines.

John Nyquist is hired to find the teenage daughter of one of the richest men in the city. But like any good detective story, nothing is what it seems.

I loved the first half, the atmosphere created and the characters and the sense of place are almost perfectly done. Towards the middle it starts to feel surreal, it’s like a bad dream where Nyquist is losing his sense of time and reality. I struggled with reading this, I’ve never enjoyed dream sequences and this was more confusing than most. It messed with my mind, and it made me feel a bit ill reading it!

It settles down towards the end though and it got a bit easier on my brain.

The writing is brilliant, and it’s full of plot twists that I didn’t predict. The atmosphere and the world building is just right, I could see Dayzone in my mind, and I loved the contrast between the frantic pace of life there and the calm and quiet in Nocturna.

I do struggle sometimes with books that leave you to decide what’s real and what’s not, but if you don’t mind that then I highly recommend this book as it’s very well done, with an interesting story, good characters, and original ideas.

I received a free copy from the publisher in return for an honest review.

A Man of Shadows
John Nyquist
Jeff Noon
Sci-Fi
August 1st 2017
Kindle
384

Ensnared by Rita Stradling

Ensnared Cover

Ensnared Blurb

A Near-Future Retelling of Beauty and the Beast

Alainn’s father is not a bad man. He’s a genius and an inventor. When he’s hired to create the robot Rose, Alainn knows taking the money is a mistake.

Rose acts like a human. She looks exactly like Alainn. But, something in her comes out wrong.

To save her father from a five year prison sentence, Alainn takes Rose’s place. She says goodbye to the sun and goes to live in a tower no human is allowed to enter. She becomes the prisoner of a man no human is allowed to see.

Believing that a life of servitude lies ahead, Alainn finds a very different fate awaits her in the company of the strange, scarred recluse.

This novel contains adult situations and is only suitable for readers who are 18+.

My Review of Ensnared

EnsnaredEnsnared by Rita Stradling
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Ensnared is based on Beauty and the Beast, but it takes the basic idea and runs with it, throwing in sci-fi elements with automatons, AI, and self-aware robots.

I was expecting a young adult story from the blurb, but it’s aimed at adults.

If I’m being honest the story is daft, there’s not a lot of world building, and there are plot holes you can drive a truck through. But it’s also a lot of fun, with likeable characters.

I liked Alainn, she’s independent and not afraid to speak her mind, but she’s not perfect. She’s not overly intelligent and is prone to taking risks that endanger her life. It’s this daredevil impulse that leads her to agree to impersonate the robot Lorccan has ordered to save her father from going to jail. It (kind of) makes sense in context.

Lorccan is a recluse who is scared of germs and has little to no experience of other people. I can almost believe he doesn’t realise that he got a real person instead of a robot, even though Alainn is very, very bad at pretending to be a robot. She doesn’t even think about how she is going to eat, so almost starves herself at first. I think about food all the time, so if I was going to have to pretend to be a robot somewhere it’s probably the first thing I would worry about.

I liked that Lorcann’s problems aren’t magically fixed by the power of lurve. At the end of the book, he still can’t leave his home for fear of germs. It’s clear that it’s a bigger, ongoing issue that Alainn can’t fix for him.

My favourite character in this has to be Shelley. She has anxiety, and battles with herself when she pushes herself way out of her comfort zone to help Alainn when things go wrong. She reaches a point where she can’t force herself any further and leaves with the police instead of escaping with Alainn. I loved that she wasn’t treated as a coward for this, instead, Alainn thanks her and calls her a badass.

If you want something that’s not going to tax your brain and you can just enjoy reading it, then this is a good choice. I read it in a day, I didn’t want to put it down. I even had to have it propped up in front of me while I was brushing my teeth!

I received a free copy from the publisher in return for an honest review.

Ensnared
Rita Stradling
Sci-Fi
May 23rd 2017
Kindle
419

The War Of The Flowers by Tad Williams

The War of the Flowers Blurb

In the great city, in the dimly lit office of an impossibly tall building, two creatures meet. Gold changes hands and the master of the House of Hellebore gives an order: ‘War is coming, the child must die’.

My review of The War of the Flowers

The War Of The FlowersThe War Of The Flowers by Tad Williams
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

It’s slow, boring and more than a little bit depressing, but the worst thing about it is the main character, Theo. He whines his way through the entire book and gives not a single care about the people around him.

I really disliked him and I can’t understand Poppy falling for him. He thinks about her like she’s a spoiled rich kid, and he treats her that way too. Despite not giving a damn about other people himself he condemns Poppy because without getting to know her he decides that she is like that too. But to be fair Poppy seems to be there only to give Theo a bit of escape from the grinding depression of the rest of the story. She is an extraneous addition to the actual story, only popping up now and again to help Theo show his “kind side”.

If fact, all the women are present only to have things happen to them in order to motivate the male characters. Theo’s mother, his girlfriend cat, Applecore, Eamonn Dowds girlfriend, they all suffer terrible things so that the men in the story have reasons to act.

The story itself moves super slow and consists of 600 pages of Theo thinking “I’m stuck in a world that could kill you at any moment and I know nothing about it” and talking about how he’s a super awesome amazing musician / singer.

Fairyland is not a happy place to be. There are six ruling families with all the power and the money, and the rest of the population are treated as slaves to be used up until they die. The ruling families are fighting amongst themselves and Theo is stuck in the middle running from something trying to kill him with nowhere to go, no idea why he’s been chased, and no one he can trust to help him.

It feels hopeless from the start, Theo does not find anything out, no one will tell him anything. Almost all the characters Theo talks to – “I’m not the one to tell you about this”. But Theo doesn’t really try very hard, and he’s slow to pick up on things when the clues are laid out in front of him. The Clover Effect is mentioned like 50 times through the book, Theo never asks what it is! It’s frustrating to read.

Overall it’s just boring and slow. 

Why did I keep reading? Well, I’m not sure, but at one point dragons showed up and it got interesting for about a minute. Also, Poppy is kinda cool, I was hoping she might get to do something. If the story had been told from her point of view, it could have been good.

Recommended If

You’re too happy and want some relentless grinding depression to bring you down a bit.

The War Of The Flowers
Tad Williams
Fantasy
April 22nd 2003
Paperback
758

A Blackbird in Twilight (Blackbird #4) by Freda Warrington

A Blackbird in Twilight Blurb

The great Serpent M’gulfn is dead, all save one of its demon-servants destroyed. Now is the time when the power of sorcery might be harnessed for good or for evil.

Journeying disguised to Gorethria comes Melkavesh, daughter of Silvren and Ashurek, eager to use that latent power for good. It seems she is too late, for a ruthless usurper, Duke Xaedrek, has already seized control. Aided by a demon with malign intentions of its own, he intends to restore the evil Gorethrian Empire.

To save the Earth of Three Planes, Melkavesh must defeat Xaedrek – even though their conflict may claim innocent victims and bring other lands to ruin. And can she withstand the temptation to reclaim her birthright – the dark throne renounced by Ashurek – or resist the all-too-seductive charm of Xaedrek himself?

My Reviews of Other Books in the Series

A Blackbird in Silver (Blackbird #1)

A Blackbird in Darkness (Blackbird #2)

A Blackbird in Amber (Blackbird #3)

My Review of A Blackbird in Twilight

A Blackbird in TwilightA Blackbird in Twilight by Freda Warrington
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

What a ride! This has taken my emotions up and down so much it’s taken me three days to be able to start writing a review.

A Blackbird in Twilight is the fourth book in Blackbird series, and the concluding part of the story started in A Blackbird in Amber.

Mellorn / Melkavesh has raised an army to repel the Gorethrian army. But her sorcery has been no help to her, and the Gorethrian Emperor Xaedrek is using the power of the last remaining demon to strengthen his soldiers and power his war machines.

But they all fail to see that the biggest threat to Earth is the demon, who has dark plans of their own.

There is some serious character growth in this book! The characters are all imperfect shades of grey.

Mellorn wants to stop the Empire enslaving the whole continent, but she also has her own ego. She sees herself as a saviour, as a leader and an Empress, and she can’t see her own faults.

Kharaan thinks of herself as a coward, but over the two books, she has evolved into a strong and resilient woman. She acts as Mellorn’s conscience, putting the brakes on the sorceress’ ego.

Xaedrek is doing some very bad things and has allowed himself to be controlled by the demon. But his motivation is his love of Gorethria, and he is sensible and logical and capable of caring. We see all sides of him and he comes across as a real person, not a cardboard cutout villainous Emperor.

The first Blackbird book I enjoyed, but you could see Freda Warrington’s inexperience as a writer, and I found it a little bit naive. Her writing was good from the first book but also improved massively over the series. This fourth book is multilayered and deeply thought out. It’s well written and atmospheric and full of difficult decisions for her characters. There are no right answers here, no obvious rights and wrongs

I can never guess where the story is going to go next, what the characters will do, how they will deal with their problems. And yet, when it happens, when things are resolved, it’s hard to see how it could have happened any other way.

Don’t read Freda Warrington if you don’t want a bittersweet ending. I feel heartbroken and yet happy at the same time. And she is so very good at making her villains so human you understand their actions, and even sympathise with them.

This is the most enjoyable fantasy series I’ve read in a long time, and this book has easily earned its five stars.

A Blackbird in Twilight
Blackbird
Freda Warrington
Fantasy
1988
Paperback
387

Full Moon Rising (Riley Jenson Guardian #1) by Keri Arthur

Full Moon Rising

Full Moon Rising Blurb

A rare hybrid of vampire and werewolf, Riley Jenson and her twin brother, Rhoan, work for Melbourne’s Directorate of Other Races, an organization created to police the supernatural races–and protect humans from their depredations.

While Rhoan is an exalted guardian, a.k.a. assassin, Riley is merely an office worker–until her brother goes missing on one of his missions. The timing couldn’t be worse. More werewolf than vampire, Riley is vulnerable to the moon heat, the weeklong period before the full moon, when her need to mate becomes all-consuming.

My Review of Full Moon Rising

Full Moon Rising (Riley Jenson Guardian, #1)Full Moon Rising by Keri Arthur
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I read this because I was having a lazy Sunday and I wanted a book I could read with half my brain turned off.

This has been sat on my shelf for months because I was expecting it to be a bit rubbish, the blurb makes it sound like a cheap Anita Blake knock off, focused 100% on sex. But actually, it was ok.

Main character Riley Jenson is interesting if verging a little too far towards a perfect wish fulfilment character for my liking. She’s described as a “drop dead gorgeous red head with long legs”. She works as a guardian assistant but is better at the guardian job than the actual guardians. Everyone she meets seems to think she’s amazing.

It’s saved by Riley’s internal dialogue, it avoids the super annoying thing where the super special character has no confidence and thinks they’re ugly and rubbish at everything. she’s confident and funny and quite happy to be good at things.

The Second half gets very repetitive though. Riley gets kidnapped, the full moon fever takes over, she finds out more info from the ‘bad guys’ and then she escapes. About 5 or 6 times. And the stuff about the full moon fever was daft and got very dull.

So it was fun for an afternoon, but I’m not bothered about reading the next one.

Full Moon Rising
Riley Jenson Guardian
Keri Arthur
Urban Fantasy
2007
Paperback

The Three-Body Problem (Remembrance of Earth’s Past #1) by Liu Cixin

The Three-Body Problem cover

The Three-Body Problem Blurb

1967: Ye Wenjie witnesses Red Guards beat her father to death during China’s Cultural Revolution. This singular event will shape not only the rest of her life but also the future of mankind.

Four decades later, Beijing police ask nanotech engineer Wang Miao to infiltrate a secretive cabal of scientists after a spate of inexplicable suicides. Wang’s investigation will lead him to a mysterious online game and immerse him in a virtual world ruled by the intractable and unpredictable interaction of its three suns.

This is the Three-Body Problem and it is the key to everything: the key to the scientists’ deaths, the key to a conspiracy that spans light-years and the key to the extinction-level threat humanity now faces.

My Review of The Three-Body Problem

The Three-Body Problem (Remembrance of Earth’s Past, #1)The Three-Body Problem by Liu Cixin
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Absolutely loved everything about this, but I don’t want to give too much away about the story. It’s unusual and half the fun of the book for me was watching the events unfold and start to make sense as Wang Miao investigates the mystery of why the scientists are committing suicide.

I loved that it’s a proper hard sci-fi book, very science heavy. A lot of it I could follow, some of it I couldn’t but I just enjoyed going along for the ride. There are some very interesting, original ideas with a massive scope and although I was a bit lost at first it all come together into a very entertaining story.

One of my favourite things about the book is how there are female scientists, even back in the 70s, and it’s not an issue, it’s just normal. I don’t know if that’s how things are in China, or if it’s down to how the author wrote it, but it was lovely to read women being able to get on with the science without having to explain it.

The translator has done a brilliant job. There are a few footnotes, especially in the chapters set in the past during the Cultural Revolution. They were helpful and not excessive, and there weren’t as many of them once the story got going.

I’m giving it five stars simply because I enjoyed it so much. It has everything I like in a sci-fi book, and I recommend to anyone who likes writers like Isaac Asimov, who enjoyed The Martian, or who likes thought-provoking sci-fi with massive ideas.

The Three-Body Problem
Remembrance of Earth's Past
Liu Cixin
Sci-Fi
December 3rd 2015
Paperback
442