Gilded Cage by Vic James

gilded cage by vic james

Book Description

For readers of Victoria Aveyard and Kiera Cass comes a darkly fantastical debut set in a modern England where magically gifted aristocrats rule—and commoners are doomed to serve.
 
NOT ALL ARE FREE.
NOT ALL ARE EQUAL.
NOT ALL WILL BE SAVED.

Our world belongs to the Equals—aristocrats with magical gifts—and all commoners must serve them for ten years.

But behind the gates of England’s grandest estate lies a power that could break the world.

A girl thirsts for love and knowledge.
 
Abi is a servant to England’s most powerful family, but her spirit is free. So when she falls for one of their noble-born sons, Abi faces a terrible choice. Uncovering the family’s secrets might win her liberty—but will her heart pay the price?
 
A boy dreams of revolution.
 
Abi’s brother, Luke, is enslaved in a brutal factory town. Far from his family and cruelly oppressed, he makes friends whose ideals could cost him everything. Now Luke has discovered there may be a power even greater than magic: revolution.
 
And an aristocrat will remake the world with his dark gifts.

He is a shadow in the glittering world of the Equals, with mysterious powers no one else understands. But will he liberate—or destroy?

My Review

Gilded Cage (Dark Gifts #1)Gilded Cage by Vic James
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Well written, but there were a lot of characters and viewpoints to keep track of. Some of them were complex and well written, like Luke and Gavan, but others felt flat.

Amy especially was very two dimensional. There wasn’t much time spent in her viewpoint and there just wasn’t enough to see her personality. There was supposedly a romance starting between her and Jenner but there weren’t any signs of this building up in the (minimal) interactions between them. Amy swoons over him a bit, he shows no interest at all.

Luke was the main focus of this book though, and he is a more interesting character. We see how he develops from being a carefree teenager to starting to understand the injustice in the world and the imbalance between the skilled and the non-skilled.

The story itself doesn’t offer much that is groundbreaking or original, and it is a bit predictable, but it did keep me interested. The world building was well done with a lot of history that is drip fed to us – no big information dumps! The magic of the skilled, or the Equals as they are known, is not discussed much even amongst themselves so little is explained as to how it works. I feel like this will be explored more in the next couple of books.

There are a lot of dark moments in this, like the way the non-skilled are treated as inhuman when they’re doing their slave days, and the story of the man that became the Dog. These help to add depth and realism to the world and stop it from being childish, even though the politics are very basic.

I’m not desperate for the sequel, but I probably will read it when it’s released, I’d like to see where the story is going.

I received a free copy from the publisher in return for an honest review.

View all my reviews on GoodReads

Gilded Cage
Dark Gifts
Vic James
Young Adult Fantasy
January 26 2017

Christmas books for people that don’t like Christmas

Christmas Books

I actually do like Christmas, but I don’t like the overly sentimental, desperate to make you feel something rubbish that comes along with it.

The six books here are either set at Christmas, or have a wintery, dark feel to them. All of them offer something a bit different to the normal mass produced Christmas stories.

Miss Smilla’s Feeling for Snow

by Peter Høeg, Tiina Nunnally (Translator)

There’s a lot of snow in this book, and it’s actually set over Christmas, though you wouldn’t know it because the main character Smilla is not interested in Christmas at all. It’s bleak and completely unsentimental, but the story about a six-year-old boy who falls off a roof is gripping.

Miss Smilla’s Feeling for Snow on GoodReads

The Last Wish

by Andrzej Sapkowski

Another one that’s not set at Christmas, because it’s set in another world entirely. A fantasy about a witcher, a man with magic powers who hunts monsters for money. This has been made into a video game and I can see why because it’s faced paced and fun to read. The perfect antidote to Christmas mush, I’ve just bought the next book in the series to read.

The Last Wish on GoodReads

The Sittaford Mystery

by Agatha Christie

There’s nothing better than a good Agatha Christie to read in the winter. This has all the usual elements, an impossible murder, a country house, a truck full of red herrings, and throws in a seance and a winter with a heavy snowfall. Christmas is there too, but blink and you’ll miss it.

The Sittaford Mystery on GoodReads

The Taxidermist’s Daughter

by Kate Mosse

Set in the Autumn and not at Winter, but it has dark stormy weather and an isolated house. The creepy Victorian atmosphere makes this perfect for reading at this time of year.

The Taxidermist’s Daughter on GoodReads

The Snow Child

by Eowyn Ivey

I don’t’ normally recommend books I haven’t read, but the description alone made me want to add this to this list. Jack and Mabel build a child out of snow.

The next morning, the snow child is gone–but they glimpse a young, blonde-haired girl running through the trees. She hunts with a red fox at her side, skims lightly across the snow, and somehow survives alone in the Alaskan wilderness.

The Book Thief

by Markus Zusak

A story “about the ability of books to feed the soul.” this is on the list because a small part of the book happens over Christmas. It’s set in Germany during World War II and it is narrated by Death. Worth reading just for how unusual that is, but the tale of a young girl who is living with a poor foster family and can’t resist stealing books for herself is both beautiful and heartbreaking. I can’t promise you won’t cry at this one, but it’s not cheap sentiment added just to get a reaction.

The Book Thief on GoodReads