Dark Matter by Michelle Paver

Dark Matter Cover

January 1937. Clouds of war are gathering over a fogbound London. Twenty-eight year old Jack is poor, lonely, and desperate to change his life, so when he’s offered the chance to join an Arctic expedition, he jumps at it.

Spirits are high as the ship leaves Norway: five men and eight huskies, crossing the Barents Sea by the light of the midnight sun. At last they reach the remote, uninhabited bay where they will camp for the next year, Gruhuken, but the Arctic summer is brief. As night returns to claim the land, Jack feels a creeping unease. One by one, his companions are forced to leave. He faces a stark choice: stay or go.

Soon he will see the last of the sun, as the polar night engulfs the camp in months of darkness. Soon he will reach the point of no return–when the sea will freeze, making escape impossible.

Gruhuken is not uninhabited. Jack is not alone. Something walks there in the dark.

My Review of Dark Matter

Dark MatterDark Matter by Michelle Paver
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The story of the expedition to the Arctic is interesting and the descriptions are brilliantly done. The characters felt real to me, and I cared about what happened to them.

But I didn’t get enough of a feel for the the isolation or the darkness. Jack is never alone for long, then when he is he’s busy. I liked the journal format and I think it worked, but when Jack writes in it he condenses his day to the interesting bits and the long lonely hours aren’t included.

I did read it in the middle of summer, which didn’t help the atmosphere. I think this book would benefit from being read on a cold, dark evening. If you’re on your own, even better.

The important question: was I scared? Well, sort of, but not really. There was a nice build up, but it went on for too long. The reveal of how the ghost was created was creepy and very dark but felt a bit rushed and crammed in at the end. It feels like the book ends just as the scary things get going.

As a ghost story it falls a bit flat, but as a story about an Artic expedition with some dark, creepy elements then it works really well.

Dark Matter
Michelle Paver
Horror
September 1st 2011
Paperback
288

The Wicked, Wicked Ladies in the Haunted House by Mary Chase, Peter Sís (Illustrator)

the wicked wicked ladies in the haunted house

Maureen Swanson is the scourge of the neighbourhood. At age nine, she already has a reputation as a hard slapper, a loud laugher, a liar, and a stay-after-schooler. The other kids call her Stinky. So sometimes when Maureen passes the crumbling (and haunted?) Messerman mansion, she imagines that she is Maureen Messerman–rich, privileged, and powerful.

Then she finds a way into the forbidden, boarded-up house. In the hall are portraits of seven young women wearing elaborate gowns and haughty expressions. Maureen has something scathing to say to each one, but then she notices that the figures seem to have shifted in their frames. So she reaches out her finger to touch the paint–just to make sure–and touches . . . silk!

These seven daughters of privilege are colder and meaner than Maureen ever thought to be. They are wicked, wicked ladies, and Maureen has something they want.

The Wicked, Wicked Ladies in the Haunted HouseThe Wicked, Wicked Ladies in the Haunted House by Mary Chase
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

In which an unpleasant young girl meets her match in seven unpleasant sisters.

Why are the sisters considered so wicked? Because they are heartless? Because they shoplift pretty trinkets? Well, sure that makes them unpleasant but I wouldn’t call them wicked for that. Because they send Maureen back in time and were mean to her? Well, she called them all sorts of names and took Ingrid’s bracelet. The sisters did first go to Maureen’s house and try asking for it back, Maureen lied and said she didn’t have it. so I’d say they were all as bad as each other.

I think this is a book very much of its time. Written in the 60’s when a woman that didn’t care about anyone and wasn’t polite and kind probably was considered wicked.

I didn’t find it scary or spooky at all, maybe children will but I’m not convinced. I’m easy to scare, by contrast children seem to love scary things.

I did enjoy reading it though, it’s a fun adventure story with a non-typical heroine. I would just have liked to have see Maureen keep some of her mischievous ways and not become so much of a “good girl”.

The Wicked, Wicked Ladies in the Haunted House
Mary Chase, Peter Sís (Illustrator)
Children's Fantasy
September 1st 1968
Kindle
128

Books with Ghosts in Them

books with ghosts in

A Halloween influenced book list this month! These are a few of my favourite books with ghosts in 🙂

The Time of the Ghost by Diana Wynn Jones

A ghost story told from the point of view of the ghost! The ghost is one of four sisters but she doesn’t remember which one she is, or how she came to be a ghost.

The characters in this book are brilliantly done, each of the sisters is unique and complex. It’s very well written and the story had me guessing right up to the end.

Four and Twenty Blackbirds (Eden Moore #1) by Cherie Priest

Eden Moore is a tough young woman who can see ghosts. For most of her life, she has had three dead women who appear when she is in danger and when she starts to investigate who they were she starts uncovering secrets about her past.

This is a moody and atmospheric ghost story from one of my favourite authors. I love the voice of the main character and there are lots of creepy moments, including the investigation of an abandoned and haunted mental hospital.

Cthulu and Other Monsters by Sam Stone

This one is a collection of short horror stories about monsters and Cthulu.

Sam Stone manages to skip between and combine genres without it being jarring. The stories in this collection are all horror stories but they also combine other genres too. Some are a bit steampunk, and some are more sci-fi, some set in the past and some in the present. She’s clearly full of ideas and there’s a lot of originality in these stories.

The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

Nobody Owens, known as Bod, is an orphan being raised by the dead in a graveyard. It’s written for children but has more than enough intelligence, humour and pathos for adults to enjoy it too.

If you want a book that’s full of ghosts then The Graveyard Book is it!

Rivers of London (Peter Grant/Rivers of London #1) by Ben Aaronovitch

Peter Grant is a probationary constable in London. When an eyewitness to a crime he’s talking to turns out to be a ghost, Peter uncovers a different side to London where gods, ghosts and magic are commonplace.

This is more of a supernatural police procedural than a spooky, ghostly book. But it’s funny and entertaining and had me gripped as Peter investigates the evil that’s rising in London.

The Haunting of Alaizabel Cray by Chris Wooding

I loved this book – it’s full of adventure and strong characters and there are plenty of genuinely scary moments. Plus, it has monsters and ghosts and airships! It’s supposed to be a young adults book but it certainly is suitable for grown-ups too.

Wylding Hall Playlist

Wylding Hall Cover

Wylding Hall is a book I reviewed a couple of days ago. It’s a spooky haunted house story about a folk-rock band that decamp to an old hall to make an album. Set in the 70s the book has a fantastic atmosphere, and the music is a big part of the book.

It’s just right for a Halloween month read, and I put together this playlist to make it even more atmospheric 🙂

If you have any suggestions for songs please comment below, I must admit I don’t know much about 70’s folk rock! Enjoy xx

Wylding Hall by Elizabeth Hand

Wylding Hall Cover

When the young members of a British acid-folk band are compelled by their manager to record their unique music, they hole up at Wylding Hall, an ancient country house with dark secrets. There they create the album that will make their reputation, but at a terrifying cost: Julian Blake, the group’s lead singer, disappears within the mansion and is never seen or heard from again.

Now, years later, the surviving musicians, along with their friends and lovers—including a psychic, a photographer, and the band’s manager—meet with a young documentary filmmaker to tell their own versions of what happened that summer. But whose story is true? And what really happened to Julian Blake?

My Review of Wylding Hall

Wylding HallWylding Hall by Elizabeth Hand
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Following a horrible tragedy a 70’s folk band decamp to a large old country house in the middle of nowhere to write their second album. Through interviews with the members of the band and their entourage who were there at the time, we are told the story around the unexplained disappearance of one of the band members.

I loved the 1970s summer setting, with the hippie folk musicians trying to write an album in an old country house. I think the author got the vibe just right, and the supernatural elements were sufficiently creepy, but not overdone.

The interview format worked well, but some of the characters voices blended into each other, I found it was hard to keep them straight. The main characters though were unique enough to be recognisable.

I read the book in two goes. The first half I found creepy and chilling. I didn’t want to turn out the light when I went to bed that night! But when I came back to it the next day a lot of the atmosphere had gone. I don’t know if I rushed through it too fast, or if it was because I read it in the busy canteen at work, but it just wasn’t as creepy anymore. I’d recommend reading it all in one go if you can.

It’s well-written, and I enjoyed reading it, it could have done with being just a bit more of a ghost story towards the end.

Wylding Hall
Elizabeth Hand
Horror
February 17th 2015
Kindle
176