White is for Witching by Helen Oyeyemi

In a vast, mysterious house on the cliffs near Dover, the Silver family is reeling from the hole punched into its heart. Lily is gone and her twins, Miranda and Eliot, and her husband, the gentle Luc, mourn her absence with unspoken intensity. All is not well with the house, either, which creaks and grumbles and malignly confuses visitors in its mazy rooms, forcing winter apples in the garden when the branches should be bare. Generations of women inhabit its walls. And Miranda, with her new appetite for chalk and her keen sense for spirits, is more attuned to them than she is to her brother and father. She is leaving them slowly –

Slipping away from them –

And when one dark night she vanishes entirely, the survivors are left to tell her story.

“Miri I conjure you ”

This is a spine-tingling tale that has Gothic roots but an utterly modern sensibility. Told by a quartet of crystalline voices, it is electrifying in its expression of myth and memory, loss and magic, fear and love.

My Review of White is for Witching

White is for WitchingWhite is for Witching by Helen Oyeyemi
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I didn’t get the creepy vibe I was really after from this. All the elements were there but it felt like the author was using the haunted theme to try to say something else. It never came together in a coherent haunting and there was a disappointing lack of witches.

There were a lot of different themes that seemed to be running under the surface but nothing stood out enough to say anything. The thing with the refugees never went anywhere, I’m not sure why it was included. Whatever the author was trying to say was not obvious for me to understand what it was.

There are a few different narrators (one of them the house!), all of them unreliable. You never know what’s real and what’s not, what’s made up and what’s just imagined.

Miri was the main narrator but I didn’t find her very interesting. Intended to be fragile she came across as a pretentious. She had a lot of issues that weren’t really dealt with. Her twin brother was trying to distance himself from her and her father didn’t seem interested in trying to understand her problems, convincing himself he can solve her eating problems by discovering what food she would want to each. Miri starts to slowly fade away, becoming paler, thinner, and more and more distant. The book starts when she has disappeared completely.

I really enjoyed the part of the book that was told from Ore’s point of view. I liked her voice and she had an interesting story.

It’s a slow paced book but the writing is beautiful. I may not have understood it but I know it’s not really a haunted house story, it’s more about love and loss. I enjoyed the slow pace, I think it worked well with the writing style. It kind of lulled me into feeling like I was in a daydream.

I didn’t get the point of the book and that just left me feeling frustrated. I do like the way Helen Oyeyemi writes though, she has a poetic style that’s captivating to read.

White is for Witching
Helen Oyeyemi
Fiction
June 1st 2009
Paperback
244

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