Winterglass by Benjanun Sriduangkaew

The city-state Sirapirat once knew only warmth and monsoon. When the Winter Queen conquered it, she remade the land in her image, turning Sirapirat into a country of snow and unending frost. But an empire is not her only goal. In secret, she seeks the fragments of a mirror whose power will grant her deepest desire.

At her right hand is General Lussadh, who bears a mirror shard in her heart, as loyal to winter as she is plagued by her past as a traitor to her country. Tasked with locating other glass-bearers, she finds one in Nuawa, an insurgent who’s forged herself into a weapon that will strike down the queen.

To earn her place in the queen’s army, Nuawa must enter a deadly tournament where the losers’ souls are given in service to winter. To free Sirapirat, she is prepared to make sacrifices: those she loves, herself, and the complicated bond slowly forming between her and Lussadh.

If the splinter of glass in Nuawa’s heart doesn’t destroy her first.

WinterglassWinterglass by Benjanun Sriduangkaew
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I loved the atmosphere and the slow pace. I couldn’t quite picture the world, there weren’t enough details about it but the imagery and descriptive prose created an atmosphere, a feeling, so strong it almost didn’t matter to me. I’m left with lasting impressions of an icy, powerful queen and a beautiful, cold world here you have to be ruthless to survive.

Winterglass meshes sci-fi and fantasy – I’d say it’s sci-fi at the core but it’s based on a retelling of Snow White and the fantasy feel is very strong. It’s so well combined that it wasn’t until afterwards that I found myself wondering what genre it is. It’s definitely original and inventive and brings something new to both genres.

The writing falls just short of (or goes a bit too far over) the beautiful, descriptive style the author seems to be aiming for. Edging just too far into complicated, it made it difficult for me to follow the story. It ends up in ‘why use one word when you can use ten’ territory and drops in so many unusual ‘big’ words that I found myself having to use the Kindle dictionary on nearly every page. I don’t mind looking up words every so often but this was too excessive for me and interrupted my enjoyment of the story.

Near the end, I was struggling to concentrate enough to follow what was happening. I found myself reading other books as a break from the amount of brain power I had to use on this. I’m still not sure what the author was trying to do with the ending and I can’t tell if the story is done or not. It’s open-ended so a sequel is possible but it’s also possible that the author intended the story to be done.

Nuanced, intricate stories where you have to work out for yourself the characters motivations might be your thing, if so I think Winterglass could easily be a four-star book for you. I appreciated the depth but I found it hard to follow and I couldn’t grasp the reasons behind Nuawa’s actions at the end. I also felt the use of so many fancy words came across as the author trying too hard to impress. For these reasons, I’m only giving three stars.

I received a free copy from the publisher in return for an honest review.

Winterglass
Benjanun Sriduangkaew
Sci-Fi
December 2017
Kindle

Leave a Reply