Angel of the Blockade by Alex Wells

Angel of the Blockade Cover

Nata spends her time zipping through the black in her ugly yet bad-ass spaceship, taking pride in being the best smuggler the Imperial regime has never caught. When she takes on an expensive mystery cargo, however, the risk reaches far beyond her pride.

My Thoughts

Angel of the BlockadeAngel of the Blockade by Alex Wells
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

“The bar smells like old socks, sour beer, and just an edge of mustiness, which means the air filters are probably a couple weeks past due. Starting to go moldy, but not bad enough to actually give anyone a respiratory infection. It almost overwhelms the weird, dirty cinnamon scent that characterizes Corona Nine Station and never leaves the back of your throat once you’ve sucked in your first lungful.”

I loved the setting; Alex Wells has a gift for creating unique and believable worlds and universes and this one is brought to life in the first few paragraphs. It is vaguely reminiscent of Firefly but grittier and more grown up. The writing brings the story to life so much I can picture myself there.

The story is exciting and drew me in straight away. Nata is a brilliant character and I liked the way her situation is explained subtly without us being told about her by info dumps.

The only thing that stopped me from rating this higher is that I felt it tried to fit too much in. The time devoted to setting the scene at the start is probably my favourite part of it because the rest ended up too rushed and crammed in at the end. I got a bit lost with the story and I really wanted more from it. I wish it had been longer!

Give this one a go and if you like it check out the authors Ghost Wolves series, one of my personal favourites.

Angel of the Blockade
Alex Wells
Sci-Fi
September 6th 2017
Online
29

Tanglefoot (The Clockwork Century #1.2) by Cherie Priest

Stonewall Jackson survived Chancellorsville. England broke the Union’s naval blockade, and formally recognized the Confederate States of America. Atlanta never burned.

It is 1880. The American Civil War has raged for nearly two decades, driving technology in strange and terrible directions. Combat dirigibles skulk across the sky and armoured vehicles crawl along the land. Military scientists twist the laws of man and nature and barter their souls for weapons powered by light, fire, and steam.

But life struggles forward for soldiers and ordinary citizens. The fractured nation is dotted with stricken towns and epic scenes of devastation–some manmade, and some more mysterious. In the western territories, cities are swallowed by gas and walled away to rot while the frontiers are strip-mined for resources. On the borders between North and South, spies scour and scheme, and smugglers build economies more stable than their governments.

This is the Clockwork Century.

It is dark here, and different.

My Review of Tanglefoot

Free to read online, Tanglefoot is a short steampunk story set in The Clockwork Century universe. It’s standalone so you don’t need to have read the first book in the series before you read this.

Edwin is a young boy living in hiding in a sanitarium, in the basement lab of an elderly inventor. As the inventor slowly slides into dementia, Edwin becomes more and more lonely, eventually building himself a robot friend that he names Ted.

But robot Ted isn’t as friendly as Edwin hoped it would be.

I love Cherie Priest’s books, and this atmospheric and creepy short story is a good starting point for the Clockwork Century series.

You can read Tanglefoot online for free.

Tanglefoot
The Clockwork Century
Cherie Priest
Steampunk
34

Folding Beijing by Hao Jingfang, Ken Liu (translator)

Folding Beijing Cover

A good story that starts off well and has some very interesting ideas.

The city of Beijing has solved it’s over population problem by splitting the city into three different spaces that can move and fold up underground. Each space unfolds into the open at a different time, and of course, the rich people in First Space get longer out in the open.

Third Space was vibrant and full of life, I enjoyed the parts that were set there. When the character actually reaches First Space though I thought the story became dull and flat, only picking up again at the end.

You can read online at Uncanny Magazine for free

Folding Beijing
Hao Jingfang
Sci-Fi
January 2015
40

Hello, Moto by Nnedi Okorafor

hello moto

There is witchcraft in science and a science to witchcraft. Both will conspire against you eventually.

My Review of Hello, Moto

In Hello, Moto, technology and magic merge into one very interesting short story.

Philo had been in Jos when the riots happened. I knew it was her and her wig. A technology I had created. Neurotransmitters, mobile phones, incantation, and hypnosis- even I knew my creation was genius. But all it sparked in the North was death and mayhem.

It left me with more questions than answers and it’s a massive cliffhanger ending, but I feel like that’s a good thing.

You definitely need to use your own imagination when you’re reading this.

Read for free at Tor.com

Hello, Moto
Nnedi Okorafor
Fantasy
Online Short Story

The Tides by Ken Liu

“When I was little,” Dad says, softly chuckling, “the Moon was so small I thought I could put it in my pocket, like a coin.” I don’t answer because there’s no time to talk. The tide is coming.

Short (very short – 3 or 4 pages worth) post-apocalyptic story that somehow manages to pack more story in than most books.

It has some very touching moments and some beautiful phrases.

“I guess the Moon loves the Earth too much. She wants to come closer for a kiss.”

A must read!

You can read The Tides online for free

The Tides
Ken Liu
Sci-Fi
Online Short Story