Good Morning, Midnight by Lily Brooks-Dalton

Augustine, a brilliant, aging astronomer, is consumed by the stars. For years he has lived in remote outposts, studying the sky for evidence of how the universe began. At his latest posting, in a research center in the Arctic, news of a catastrophic event arrives. The scientists are forced to evacuate, but Augustine stubbornly refuses to abandon his work. Shortly after the others have gone, Augustine discovers a mysterious child, Iris, and realizes that the airwaves have gone silent. They are alone.

At the same time, Mission Specialist Sullivan is aboard the Aether on its return flight from Jupiter. The astronauts are the first human beings to delve this deep into space, and Sully has made peace with the sacrifices required of her: a daughter left behind, a marriage ended. So far the journey has been a success. But when Mission Control falls inexplicably silent, Sully and her crewmates are forced to wonder if they will ever get home.

As Augustine and Sully each face an uncertain future against forbidding yet beautiful landscapes, their stories gradually intertwine in a profound and unexpected conclusion. In crystalline prose, Good Morning, Midnight poses the most important questions: What endures at the end of the world? How do we make sense of our lives? Lily Brooks-Dalton’s captivating debut is a meditation on the power of love and the bravery of the human heart.

My Review of Good Morning, Midnight

Good Morning, MidnightGood Morning, Midnight by Lily Brooks-Dalton
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Good Morning, Midnight is a very quiet, contemplative end of the world novel.

It’s about two of the last survivors on Earth, Augustine and Sully. Augustine is a scientist living in a remote centre in the Arctic and Sully is an astronaut on a long journey back to Earth from Jupiter. As they face the prospect of being the last people on Earth, alone and isolated, they look back over their lives, thinking about the mistakes they’ve made and things they wish they had done differently. And we find out that Augustine and Sully are two people who have a lot of regret in their lives, a lot of times they’ve chosen their careers and ambitions over a chance to connect with people.

What this book isn’t about is the end of the world. Whatever happens that the world just goes quiet isn’t really important in this story and is never explained. I went in expecting that from the blurb and other reviews I’ve read so I wasn’t too disappointed but it does leave me wondering what happened, what could go so wrong that the world just goes dead like that.

I loved the setting – Augustine is a scientist in the artic and Sully is travelling through space returning home after a journey to study Jupiter. They’re both living in isolated, very open places with only a relatively thin shell protecting them from environments that could easily kill them. And I just love the way science runs through the story as a backdrop, from Sully’s experiments ‘listening‘ to Jupiter to Augustine’s love for amateur radio, and a lot of ways in between.

Beautiful writing complements the style of the book. I read slower just to enjoy the prose which led to me spending more time taking in the story.

If you’re looking for a pure sci-fi book there might not be enough science here to satisfy. If you don’t mind a slower more thoughtful story about regrets, forgiveness and moving forwards then give this one a go.

Good Morning, Midnight
Lily Brooks-Dalton
Sci-Fi
August 9th 2016
Paperback
288

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