Ink (Skin Books #1) by Alice Broadway

The Blurb

There are no secrets in Saintstone.

From the second you’re born, every achievement, every failing, every significant moment are all immortalized on your skin. There are honourable marks that let people know you’re trustworthy. And shameful tattoos that announce you as a traitor.

After her father dies, Leora finds solace in the fact that his skin tells a wonderful story. That is, until she glimpses a mark on the back of his neck; the symbol of the worst crime a person can commit in Saintstone. Leora knows it has to be a mistake, but before she can do anything about it, the horrifying secret gets out, jeopardizing her father’s legacy and Leora’s life.

My Thoughts

3 / 5 Stars

An interesting central idea but beyond that, there is nothing original about Ink.

A young woman with fantastic abilities or an unusually strong will realises how unequal and prejudiced her society is and takes on the fight to change it. There’s a stong Hunger Games / Divergent influence going on here. There is even a series of tests to decide what career you will have for the rest of your life.

Leora is not quite a strong enough character to carry a whole book series, she is dull and mostly uninteresting. But I can maybe forgive that for being intentional. The most interesting thing about her is actually that she is just another normal citizen – she’s a sheep, as sold on the propaganda as everyone else around her. For most of this book, she stays that way. Seeing the way she is forced to see things that don’t gel with the ‘truths’ of her society and the way she still tries to reconcile that with what the government she trusts completely tells her is the best thing about this book. There is some character growth for her along with a lot of potential for her to develop some personality for the next books.

If the normal side of her was played up more I would have been more into this but Leroa is too special. An amazing tattooist, a unique ability where she can read people’s tattoo’s and tell their whole life story, she’s too unusual and too amazing and it doesn’t fit with the normal girl feel to the start of it. Hunger Games and Divergent worked because the main characters were always odd bods, Ink had the chance to do something different with Leroa but the got ditched by the wayside by the end of this first book.

The focus around tattoos I enjoyed. Leora is training to be a tattooist, a career not many, if any, women in her society choose. Though I don’t know really why that was included because not much is made of it. Leora doesn’t face much discrimination, it takes the tattooist she is apprenticed to about a week to decide she is the most amazing thing in the world ever.

I also appreciate how morbid it is, when Leora’s father dies his skin is taken off and made into a book of his tattoos. In this way, he and all of Leora’s ancestors live on in the memories of their family. To add to this they have the continuous naming ceremonies where the names of all the dead are read out one by one in a bid to keep the memory of every person alive.

There is enough here to give this book it’s own personality but it’s too obviously the same story at the bottom of it all.

Young adult dystopia by numbers, it’s not a bad book but it doesn’t live up to the originality of the world it’s created. Beautiful cover though.

Ink
Skin Books
Alice Broadway
Young Adult Sci-Fi
February 2nd 2017
Paperback
366

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