Salt Fish Girl by Larissa Lai

Salt Fish Girl is the mesmerizing tale of an ageless female character who shifts shape and form through time and place. Told in the beguiling voice of a narrator who is fish, snake, girl, and woman – all of whom must struggle against adversity for survival – the novel is set alternately in nineteenth-century China and in a futuristic Pacific Northwest.

At turns whimsical and wry, “Salt Fish Girl” intertwines the story of Nu Wa, the shape-shifter, and that of Miranda, a troubled young girl living in the walled city of Serendipity circa 2044. Miranda is haunted by traces of her mother’s glamorous cabaret career, the strange smell of durian fruit that lingers about her, and odd tokens reminiscent of Nu Wa. Could Miranda be infected by the Dreaming Disease that makes the past leak into the present?

Framed by a playful sense of magical realism, “Salt Fish Girl” reveals a futuristic Pacific Northwest where corporations govern cities, factory workers are cybernetically engineered, middle-class labour is a video game, and those who haven’t sold out to commerce and other ills must fight the evil powers intent on controlling everything. Rich with ancient Chinese mythology and cultural lore, this remarkable novel is about gender, love, honour, intrigue, and fighting against oppression.

My Review of Salt Fish Girl

Salt Fish GirlSalt Fish Girl by Larissa Lai
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

This is a bit of an odd book but the writing style is beautiful and gripping and I loved the way the author uses the sense of smell to bring the story to life.

I’m having a difficult time trying to explain the plot because it all gets a bit odd, but the style and themes of the book I found similar to Margaret Atwood and her MaddAddam series, and the themes also remind me of Octavia E Butler’s stories. Salt Fish Girl covers creation, genetic engineering, poverty, and a world run by big businesses – but all with a feminist slant.

I have to admit, for a lot of the book I wasn’t sure what was happening. There is a main story running through it but it also jumps about in time telling the story of a woman who seems to be almost a god and the creator or mother of all humans. Both stories are interesting but I didn’t feel there was a proper ending to either of them; it’s left as though the author just suddenly felt like stopping writing.

Even though I was a bit confused by it all I still enjoyed it. It’s original and beautifully written with characters that I actually cared about. It’s certainly interesting and has a lot of points to make; it makes a good book club book because it has a lot of thought starters.

If you’re looking for a dystopian, cyberpunk style book and you don’t mind things getting a bit weird then I’d recommend giving this a go.

Salt Fish Girl
Larissa Lai
Sci-Fi
August 4th 2002
Paperback
269

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