Street Magic (Black London #1) by Caitlin Kittredge

Street Magic black London #1 review

Street Magic Description

Pete Caldecott was just sixteen when she met Jack Winter, a gorgeous, larger-than-life  mage who thrilled her with his witchcraft. Then a spirit Jack summoned killed him before Pete’s eyes.

Now a detective , Pete is investigating the case of a young girl kidnapped from the streets of London. A tip has led police directly to the child but when Pete meets the informant, she’s shocked to learn he is none other than Jack.

Strung out on heroin, Jack is a shadow of his former self.  But he’s able to tell Pete exactly where Bridget’s kidnappers are hiding: in the supernatural shadow-world of the fey.

Even though she’s spent years disavowing the supernatural, Pete follows Jack into the invisible fey underworld, where she hopes to discover the truth about what happened to Bridget—and what happened to Jack on that dark day so long ago.

My Review of Street Magic

Street Magic (Black London, #1)Street Magic by Caitlin Kittredge
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

The writing was a bit clunky and awkward. I found it was often difficult to follow what was going on, and why they are doing things.

There wasn’t much of an atmosphere to it, I didn’t get a feel for London itself, and Black London was brushed over. Pete and Jack dipped in and out of it but what it is and what it’s like wasn’t explained so it never came to life for me, I couldn’t picture it

The magic was hard to understand too, but it is a series so maybe it’s explained more in later books.

Main character Peter grated on me. I’m not convinced she is really an Inspector because she acts more like an impulsive child, shouting and whining and making daft threats to criminals. She never did any actual police work so it was hard to understand the professional side of her.

And some of the things she did were odd, like why didn’t she report the first tip off from Jack? Why keep it a secret?

I can’t remember that she what she looks like was described either. She was just a bit bland. Towards the end of the book she was getting a bit more badass, so again maybe she gets better later in the series!

I did like Jack, but I don’t understand why he holds such a grudge against Pete? He dragged her into something she didn’t understand then got upset when she ran scared. And he’d held on to it for 12 years then suddenly changed his mind?

I also liked attraction between Pete and Jack. It was building up towards the end of the book with some moments between them that sparked. I think it holds potential for future books.

Overall there just wasn’t enough magic and not enough of the police work I’d been hoping for. It didn’t hold my interest and I ended up speed reading the last third.

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Street Magic
Black London
Caitlin Kittredge
Urban Fantasy

All Darling Children by Katrina Monroe

All Darling Children review

Book Description

All boys grow up, except one.

On the tenth anniversary of her mother’s death, fourteen-year-old Madge Darling’s grandmother suffers a heart attack. With the overbearing Grandma Wendy in the hospital, Madge runs away to Chicago, intent on tracking down a woman she believes is actually her mother.

On her way to the Windy City, a boy named Peter Pan lures Madge to Neverland, a magical place where children can remain young forever. While Pan plays puppet master in a twisted game only he understands, Madge discovers the disturbing price of Peter Pan’s eternal youth.

My Review of All Darling Children
All Darling ChildrenAll Darling Children by Katrina Monroe
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

This takes the Disney version of Peter Pan and mixes in a big dollop of The Lord of the Flies. And if you think that sounds like a mix that shouldn’t work, you’d be right. Reading about the cheesiness of Tinkerbell and Smee one minute, and then sacrificing Lost Boys to ensure the survival of the Island’s magic the next is disconcerting.

Madge is the granddaughter of Wendy Darling. Though how that works when Wendy Darling was 12 or 13 in the early 1900s, and Madge is 14 in the present day, I have no idea. Anyway, she goes to Neverland with Peter Pan searching for her lost mother and the truth about her family. Once there she realises that Peter Pan is a dictator, ruling through fear and murdering anyone who stands against him.

Madge is a very underdeveloped character. She never shows any personality of her own, her only conversations with other people involve her sneering at them. Supposedly she is trying to find the truth about her family, but never displays any actual motivation towards doing anything about it.

Pan himself is much more interesting, but for me the best character in the book is the lovely Slightly. A sweet, charming boy, he is Madge’s only potential ally in the Lost Boys.

I wasn’t convinced by the story in this – there was a lot alluded to but never fully explained and Madge just ran around reacting to things and generally being unpleasant. Even her own hunger she is only aware of because Pan hears her stomach growling!

The story never got going and the battle at the end was a big anticlimax.

I received a free copy from the publisher in return for an honest review.

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All Darling Children
Katrina Monroe
Young Adult Fantasy
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