Kim & Kim Vol. 1 by Magdalene Visaggio, Eva Cabrera

Kim and Kim

Kim & Kim Blurb

Kim & Kim are twenty-something besties out to make a name for themselves in the wild world of interdimensional cowboy law enforcement. In a massive “screw you” to their parents and the authorities, they decide to hijack some high stakes bounty — and end up in way over their heads.

Kim & Kim is a day-glo action adventure that’s bursting with energy and enthusiasm. Blending the punk exuberance of TANK GIRL with the buddy adventure wackiness of SUPERBAD (if Michael Cera was a trans woman and Jonah Hill a queer girl partner in crime), Kim & Kim is a bright, happy, punk rock sci-fi adventure that is queer as shit.

My Review of Kim & Kim

Kim & Kim #1 (Kim & Kim, #1)Kim & Kim Vol. 1 by Magdalene Visaggio
My rating: 5 of 5 stars
If you follow me on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram you might have seen me posting about this graphic novel a lot recently. I’m not gonna apologise because I absolutely loved everything about Kim & Kim! It’s loud and bright and crazy, and massively fun, and you need it in your life.

The two Kims are bounty hunters, adventuring around space trying to make enough money to pay their rent. Their spaceship is a van that looks like the one from Scooby Doo, and their weapons are an electric guitar and a bright pink gun.

It feels heavily influenced by Cowboy Bebop, but it’s got the brightness (and the wonderful outfit changes) of Jem and the Holograms, the crazy fun of Adventure Time, and a massive personality all of its own.

But I like it mostly because it has two badass female main characters with realistic personalities and a strong friendship between them. They’re not just a sexy fantasy version of badass either and that’s not something you see often in the graphic novel world.

More, please.

Kim & Kim Vol. 1
Kim & Kim
Magdalene Visaggio, Eva Cabrera
Graphic Novel
December 28th 2016
Graphic Novel

House of Suns by Alastair Reynolds

House of Suns

Book Description

Six million years ago, at the dawn of the starfaring era, Abigail Gentian fractured herself into a thousand male and female clones, which she called shatterlings. But now, someone is eliminating the Gentian line. Campion and Purslane, two shatterlings who have fallen in love and shared forbidden experiences, must determine exactly who, or what, their enemy is, before they are wiped out of existence.

My Review of House of Suns

House of SunsHouse of Suns by Alastair Reynolds

The clones of the Gentian line, known as shatterlings, have spent millions of years travelling the galaxy with the aim of seeing as much as they can and reuniting after every journey to share the knowledge amongst themselves. They are eternal tourists, long lived with deep sleep technology, and time does not mean the same thing to them as it does to us.

One tour of the galaxy can take hundreds of thousands of years, by the time one of them returns to a previously visited planet whole civilisations can have risen and fallen!

To be able to travel this way they have some truly amazing spaceships and technology that allows them to extend their lifetimes or sleep in suspended animation for the journeys between planets.

Alistair Reynolds has a talent for writing massive tales of galaxy and time spanning proportions, and House of Suns does not disappoint. But he also manages to ground these space operas with human and relatable characters. Here we have Campion and Purslane, two Gentian clones that have fallen in love with each other and now risk being shunned by the rest of the shatterlings in their line.

Through their eyes we experience the wonders of the galaxy, and the people they meet on their travels. Campion is a bit of a wild card, prone to risky decisions and ill-advised schemes, and Purslane is a much more sensible and sophisticated character, she is thoughtful and compassionate.

Along the way they pick up Hesperus, a ‘Machine Person’ they rescue from a con-man, almost by mistake. Hesperus is a self-aware robot that is far smarter, stronger and much more adaptable than humans are, but he has lost his memory.

Their spaceships are almost characters in their own right. Intelligent and unique, when one of the characters almost looses her spaceship she reacts as though she is losing a loved friend.

So this has everything I would want in a book, spaceships, robots, amazing tech, I basically loved it from the first page! Then the Gentian line’s reunion is ambushed and the Gentians are almost wiped out, and the story becomes almost a murder mystery.

There are some bigger themes in there too, questioning if the use of torture can ever be justified, and the treatment of less advanced or less powerful cultures

I can’t really be objective about this book so I’m not going to even try. I loved it and I think it’s a must read for anyone that enjoys sci-fi.

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House of Suns
Alastair Reynolds
Sci-Fi
April 17th 2008
502

Days of Blood & Starlight (Daughter of Smoke & Bone #2) by Laini Taylor

Days of Blood and Starlight

Days of Blood & Starlight Description

Once upon a time, an angel and a devil fell in love and dared to imagine a world free of bloodshed and war.

This is not that world.

Art student and monster’s apprentice Karou finally has the answers she has always sought. She knows who she is—and what she is. But with this knowledge comes another truth she would give anything to undo: She loved the enemy and he betrayed her, and a world suffered for it.

In this stunning sequel to the highly acclaimed Daughter of Smoke & Bone, Karou must decide how far she’ll go to avenge her people. Filled with heartbreak and beauty, secrets and impossible choices, Days of Blood & Starlight finds Karou and Akiva on opposing sides as an age-old war stirs back to life.

While Karou and her allies build a monstrous army in a land of dust and starlight, Akiva wages a different sort of battle: a battle for redemption. For hope.

But can any hope be salvaged from the ashes of their broken dream?

My reviews of Other Books in the Series

Daughter of Smoke & Bone (Daughter of Smoke & Bone #1) by Laini Taylor

Dreams of Gods & Monsters (Daughter of Smoke & Bone #3) by Laini Taylor

Days of Blood & Starlight Review

Days of Blood & Starlight reviewDays of Blood & Starlight by Laini Taylor
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

After reading the first book and loving the bits set in Prague as much as I did I thought I just wouldn’t like the second book. I thought I’d miss the cosy, magical world of the first book. Well, I was wrong. If anything I think I like Days of Blood & Starlight even more!

There are some big themes running through this book, war and vengeance, and how violent revenge will only cause more violence. The war is the main focus of the book, with the Chimera almost wiped out and Karou working as a resurrectionist, building new bodies for dead chimaera soldiers.

Love is still here too, but it’s certainly not the teenage insta love from the first book. Karou and Akiva are on opposite sides of the war, Akiva has a lot of guilt for his part in killing the Chimera, and Karou cannot forgive him. It’s very dark and heavy on the emotions at times, but the story manages not to get too bogged down in it.

The magical atmosphere from the first book is still here though. The writing is beautiful and lifts the story out of the depths of misery. There are moments of hope thrown in for us too, and Karou’s best friend Zuzana adds some humour and light into the story. There is more actual magic, Karou is building new chimaera and Akiva is using his magic to do what he can to stop the slaughter of the survivors from the chimaera villages.

I’m seriously considering taking a day or two off work to read the next one.

View all my reviews on GoodReads

Days of Blood & Starlight
Daughter of Smoke & Bone
Laini Taylor
Young Adult Fantasy
August 15th 2013
528

The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield

the thirteenth tale

Description of The Thirteenth Tale

Angelfield House stands abandoned and forgotten. It was once home to the March family – fascinating, manipulative Isabelle, brutal, dangerous Charlie, and the wild, untamed twins, Emmeline and Adeline. But Angelfield House hides a chilling secret which strikes at the very heart of each of them, tearing their lives apart.

Now Margaret Lea is investigating Angelfield’s past – and the mystery of the March family starts to unravel. What has Angelfield been hiding? What is its connection with the enigmatic writer Vida Winter? And what is the secret that strikes at the heart of Margaret’s own, troubled life?

As Margaret digs deeper, two parallel stories unfold, and the tale she uncovers sheds a disturbing light on her own life.

My Review of The Thirteenth Tale

The Thirteenth TaleThe Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Absolutely beautiful writing, it sucked me in from the first page and would have held my interest on its own. The fact that the main character is a serious bookworm who works in a bookshop only made me even more happy to read this.

I probably would have read it to the end just for the writing, but luckily the story itself is interesting and clever. It’s a family drama at its heart, a story about people and the childhood of one of the characters. Mixed into this is more than one mystery, and the story twists and turns in the present and the past as it weaves all it’s strands together.

I found the big reveal at the end shocking, and it made all the little and unexplained bits suddenly make perfect sense. I love it when an author gives us a sensible explanation for all the odd things that have been happening, one that I haven’t been able to guess. All the hints are there if you look back through the book, they’re very cleverly hidden in plain sight. I think it would be possible to guess if you paid careful attention to everything that is said and everything that happens throughout the book.

It’s a perfect book to curl up with on a cold night. Make sure you have plenty of free time, a cosy blanket, and a big cup of tea, because you won’t want to put it down!

View all my reviews

The Thirteenth Tale
Diane Setterfield
Mystery
November 1st 2007
456